The O’Reilly Animals

A lot of smart people are working against time, using new technologies to save endangered animals and their habitats. This is where we share their stories, highlight opportunities for developers and makers to lend a hand, and, as we’re able, connect people to the resources and expertise they need.

Click on an animal to learn more

[ Project Watch ]

Sharks on Twitter

An item from the O’Reilly Solid Newsletter that caught my eye:

Surfing in West Australia? Check your Twitter feed first. 338 local sharks are on Twitter, and tweet when they get within .6 miles of shore.

Twitter messages

The Surf Life Saving WA Twitter Feed  –  @SLSWA

The sharks have been tagged as part of an ongoing Shark Monitoring Project undertaken by the Department of Fisheries to improve safety at West Australian beaches and help scientists better understand the movements of white sharks in that area.

Grey Nurse Shark

Grey Nurse shark, South West Rocks, NSW, Australia
Photograph © Richard Ling, via Wikimedia.

 

 

[ Cool Ways to Help ]   [ Project Watch ]

A Different Kind of Quantified Self

MIsfit Shine

Misfit Shine “activity monitor”

I just got a personal tracking device that tells me how many calories I’ve burned, how much sleep I got last night, and how many more steps I need to take to meet my daily goal. Lots of people I know are busily keeping track of their activities with these sorts of devices, competing with each other to get the highest daily total.

As I fiddled with the device and got it set up, I wondered if it would be possible to create a similar device that would track things like how much carbon we each add to the environment, how much waste we generate, how much water we use—and how much we’ve done during the day to mitigate our negative impact on the planet. The daily goal: to get as close to impact-neutral as possible. Read more…

[ Amazing Images ]   [ Project Watch ]

BeetleCopter View of the Serengeti

One of my earliest posts on this blog was about BeetleCam, a remote-controlled mobile camera built by Will and Matt Burrard-Lucas to get close up to all kinds of wildlife. Their goal was to shoot photographs without disturbing the animals or putting themselves in harm’s way. Their BeetleCam photographs of lions, elephants, leopards, African buffalo, and African wild dogs are startlingly beautiful.

Now BeetleCam has gone aerial: Will Burrard-Lucas has just introduced the BeetleCopter. He recently returned from the Serengeti with this beautiful aerial footage from his own custom-built camera copter.

Burrard-Lucas is a great photographer, with or without the help of BeetleCams or Copters; he’s captured exceptional images of wildlife all over the globe. His aim, as he says on his website, is “to inspire people to celebrate and conserve the natural wonders of our planet.” Mission accomplished.

If his work inspires you to look into getting a BeetleCam or BeetleCopter, check out Camtraptions, the company Burrard-Lucas recently launched to develop and sell remote and camera trap devices. You may not be able to travel the world as he does, but–if you’re into photography–with one (or both!) of these clever devices you just might discover something new in your own neck of the woods.

[ Cool Ways to Help ]

Introducing Animal Warrior

animal_warrior Animal Warrior* has all of the elements of a great video game: a perilous task, bad guys, all kinds of obstacles to overcome and puzzles to solve, exotic settings, high-tech weaponry, and general mayhem.  

Well, it could have all of those things, if someone would just take the idea and produce it. In addition to making a pile of money, the game could do some good in the real world by highlighting one of the most important conservation issues of our time.

The goal: Stop evil poachers from capturing and killing endangered species like rhinos, elephants, lions, tigers, orangutans, and leopards in remote areas of Africa and Asia. The poachers are using assault rifles, helicopters, and high-tech detection and communications tools to locate and kill the animals – and the game wardens trying to protect them. Stop the poachers, save the animals, and help the wardens.

Game action: Outsmart the poachers and smugglers by undertaking paramilitary maneuvers to thwart, capture, or kill them, overcoming obstacles and various natural perils in remote and challenging environments, and creating alliances with local game wardens and communities. Avoid inadvertently injuring or killing randomly appearing eco-tourists and innocent locals, and don’t cause significant habitat destruction as you confront and battle poachers.

Not only would Animal Warrior be a blast (literally) to play, it could also help to create wider awareness of and empathy for the real-world problem of poaching. Extra bonus: some portion of the likely-to-be-huge profits could be donated to current anti-poaching efforts in Asia and Africa. It’s a win-win-win. Who’s game?

*My working title for the game; if you create it, you can call it whatever you want. And take all the credit, too.

Elephant photograph by nickandmel2006 on flickr [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

[ Cool Ways to Help ]   [ Project Watch ]

Update: Wildlife Conservation “Build and Fly” UAV Challenge

Taking to the skies to save rhinos

Rhinoceros

By Kore (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

This October I wrote a post about the Wildlife Conservation “Build and Fly” UAV Challenge, a project sponsored by Kashmir-Robotics to help save the rhinos of Kruger National Park. Participating teams will compete for a $25,000 prize.

It’s exciting to see that 100 teams from 19 countries have signed up to participate; there are four multinational teams.

 


Volunteer to help the Challenge

Challenge organizers are in need of volunteers to help with marketing, team coordination, blogging, social media, engineering, and more. See the Challenge Facebook page for more information and updates on the competition. 

[ Amazing Images ]

Unicorn Caught by Camera Trap

First confirmed sighting in the wild in the 21st century

Wild Saola

Wild Saola – click image to see more Saola photos at arkive.org

No, that headline isn’t bait-and-switch. It’s true: last week, a World Wildlife Fund camera trap in Vietnam captured an image no one expected to see: a wild saola, aka “Asian unicorn,” so named because saola have long, slender horns that grow up to 52 centimeters long.

The species was first discovered in Vietnam in 1992 and has only been photographed in the wild four times since then. Like the mythic unicorn, little is known about their ecology and habits, and no one knows how many saola there are left in the wild. The last confirmed sighting by conservationists was from a camera trap in 1999, when the saola population was estimated to be about 1000. A decade later, conservationists estimated that the population had decreased to 200. Today saola are considered one of the most endangered species on the planet. Read more…

[ Amazing Images ]   [ Project Watch ]

The California Condor Cam

They’re back—and ready for their closeup.

Condor in flight

Condor in flight (note tagged wing).
By Pacific Southwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from Sacramento, US (Flying California condor. Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Unfortunately, as with many species, time and human beings have not been kind to the condor. The first recorded sighting of a California Condor in Monterey Bay occurred in 1602, by Spanish explorer Father Antonio de la Ascension. At the time, California Condors roamed large areas of the American Southwest and West Coast. By 1987, the birds were nearly extinct due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction.

The last remaining condors in the wild—the entire population consisted of 22 individuals—were captured in 1987 and moved to zoos in San Diego and Los Angeles in an attempt to save the species through a captive breeding program. That program has been a success: since 1991, condors have been slowly released into the wild, and today there are 435 condors in existence, 237 of which live in the wild.

In mid-October, the first camera to capture live streaming video of condors in the wild was turned on in the remote hills of Big Sur. Read more…