The O’Reilly Animals

A lot of smart people are working against time, using new technologies to save endangered animals and their habitats. This is where we share their stories, highlight opportunities for developers and makers to lend a hand, and, as we’re able, connect people to the resources and expertise they need.

Click on an animal to learn more

[ Cool Ways to Help ]

Introducing Animal Warrior

animal_warrior Animal Warrior* has all of the elements of a great video game: a perilous task, bad guys, all kinds of obstacles to overcome and puzzles to solve, exotic settings, high-tech weaponry, and general mayhem.  

Well, it could have all of those things, if someone would just take the idea and produce it. In addition to making a pile of money, the game could do some good in the real world by highlighting one of the most important conservation issues of our time.

The goal: Stop evil poachers from capturing and killing endangered species like rhinos, elephants, lions, tigers, orangutans, and leopards in remote areas of Africa and Asia. The poachers are using assault rifles, helicopters, and high-tech detection and communications tools to locate and kill the animals – and the game wardens trying to protect them. Stop the poachers, save the animals, and help the wardens.

Game action: Outsmart the poachers and smugglers by undertaking paramilitary maneuvers to thwart, capture, or kill them, overcoming obstacles and various natural perils in remote and challenging environments, and creating alliances with local game wardens and communities. Avoid inadvertently injuring or killing randomly appearing eco-tourists and innocent locals, and don’t cause significant habitat destruction as you confront and battle poachers.

Not only would Animal Warrior be a blast (literally) to play, it could also help to create wider awareness of and empathy for the real-world problem of poaching. Extra bonus: some portion of the likely-to-be-huge profits could be donated to current anti-poaching efforts in Asia and Africa. It’s a win-win-win. Who’s game?

*My working title for the game; if you create it, you can call it whatever you want. And take all the credit, too.

Elephant photograph by nickandmel2006 on flickr [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

[ Cool Ways to Help ]   [ Project Watch ]

Update: Wildlife Conservation “Build and Fly” UAV Challenge

Taking to the skies to save rhinos

Rhinoceros

By Kore (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

This October I wrote a post about the Wildlife Conservation “Build and Fly” UAV Challenge, a project sponsored by Kashmir-Robotics to help save the rhinos of Kruger National Park. Participating teams will compete for a $25,000 prize.

It’s exciting to see that 100 teams from 19 countries have signed up to participate; there are four multinational teams.

 


Volunteer to help the Challenge

Challenge organizers are in need of volunteers to help with marketing, team coordination, blogging, social media, engineering, and more. See the Challenge Facebook page for more information and updates on the competition. 

[ Amazing Images ]

Unicorn Caught by Camera Trap

First confirmed sighting in the wild in the 21st century

Wild Saola

Wild Saola – click image to see more Saola photos at arkive.org

No, that headline isn’t bait-and-switch. It’s true: last week, a World Wildlife Fund camera trap in Vietnam captured an image no one expected to see: a wild saola, aka “Asian unicorn,” so named because saola have long, slender horns that grow up to 52 centimeters long.

The species was first discovered in Vietnam in 1992 and has only been photographed in the wild four times since then. Like the mythic unicorn, little is known about their ecology and habits, and no one knows how many saola there are left in the wild. The last confirmed sighting by conservationists was from a camera trap in 1999, when the saola population was estimated to be about 1000. A decade later, conservationists estimated that the population had decreased to 200. Today saola are considered one of the most endangered species on the planet. Read more…

[ Amazing Images ]   [ Project Watch ]

The California Condor Cam

They’re back—and ready for their closeup.

Condor in flight

Condor in flight (note tagged wing).
By Pacific Southwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from Sacramento, US (Flying California condor. Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Unfortunately, as with many species, time and human beings have not been kind to the condor. The first recorded sighting of a California Condor in Monterey Bay occurred in 1602, by Spanish explorer Father Antonio de la Ascension. At the time, California Condors roamed large areas of the American Southwest and West Coast. By 1987, the birds were nearly extinct due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction.

The last remaining condors in the wild—the entire population consisted of 22 individuals—were captured in 1987 and moved to zoos in San Diego and Los Angeles in an attempt to save the species through a captive breeding program. That program has been a success: since 1991, condors have been slowly released into the wild, and today there are 435 condors in existence, 237 of which live in the wild.

In mid-October, the first camera to capture live streaming video of condors in the wild was turned on in the remote hills of Big Sur. Read more…

[ Cool Ways to Help ]

Makers: Build the winning drone and win $25,000

Wildlife Conservation “Build and Fly” UAV Challenge

Kashmir-Robotics, a division of the Al-Kareem Foundation, is hosting the Wildlife Conservation Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Challenge to stop rhino poaching in Kruger National Park.

The Problem

Kruger National Park in South Africa is home to 80% of the world’s rhinoceros. Since 2010, over 50% of the rhino population in Kruger has been killed by poachers harvesting the rhinos’ horns for the Asian black market. The park is patrolled by rangers, but since Kruger is about the size of New Jersey, it’s nearly impossible for them to catch poachers in the act.

“Most of the rhino poaching in South Africa’s Kruger National Park is done by incursions from neighboring Mozambique. Poachers enter the park and cross the unfenced South African border in the bush at night. They will then hunt for rhino and other animals using large caliber hunting rifles and night vision goggles. They are also armed with AK47 automatic assault rifles. They can illegally enter the park anywhere along the 220 mile border with Mozambique and operate for 1-3 days or longer at a time. This is rough African bush. There are almost no roads, only narrow game paths. No runways. No cellphone signal at ground level. They need to be detected and stopped before any animals are shot. “

The Challenge

The challenge is to design aircraft that can be launched in the bush, operate for hours over the rugged terrain, detect and locate poachers, communicate over existing commercial infrastructures, and be recovered in the bush — all for under $3000 in materials. Read more…

[ Amazing Images ]   [ Cool Ways to Help ]   [ Project Watch ]

Essential things you probably don’t know much about

We’re talking plankton. Yep, plankton.

Amphipod

Amphipod (Zooplankton)

Bet most of you don’t know much about plankton, but you probably should, since they contribute substantially to the oxygen you breathe, among other essential planet-supporting activities. Now there’s a fun, mind-expanding way to learn about these exceptionally hard-working organisms—and help scientists collect data about the effects of climate change on the world’s oceans.

In mid-September, Zooniverse launched a project to crowd-source identification of plankton from photographic images captured at various locations around the globe. By identifying the numbers, sizes, and types of plankton found in these areas, scientists can analyze where and when plankton occur at different depths in the ocean; this information is a key to understanding the health of the oceans’ ecosystems.

Read more…

[ Amazing Images ]   [ Project Watch ]

Take a Virtual Tour of the World’s Coral Reefs

Photographers with new tools and technologies document reefs worldwide

In the 1960s and 70s,  the TV documentary series The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau brought the magnificence of the oceans to millions of viewers. Cousteau, a French researcher, explorer, and filmmaker involved in oceanography since the 1940s, quickly became a cultural icon and a leading voice in the environmental movement.

Today, you don’t have to watch a TV documentary to see the undersea landscapes Jacques Cousteau spent his life documenting: thanks to the Catlin Seaview Survey, everyone can now conduct their own virtual tours of coral reefs, right on their laptops.

Coral Reef near Heron Island

An image of the coral reef near Heron Island, taken using the Seaview SVII camera.
By © Underwater Earth / Catlin Seaview Survey – www.catlinseaviewsurvey.com [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commonswww.catlinseaviewsurvey.com [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

According to the Survey’s website, 40-50% of corals have been lost over the last 50 years due to pollution, overfishing, and climate change. And this decline is likely to continue, which is a critical issue for millions of people who rely on the reefs for food, coastal protection, and tourism dollars.

The Catlin Seaview Survey, launched in September 2012 on the Great Barrier Reef, aims “to scientifically record the world’s coral reefs and reveal them all in high-resolution, 360-degree panoramic vision.” The image data collected by the survey will enable change to be monitored over time, enabling scientists, policymakers, and the general public to see and understand what’s happening to the reefs, which may spur more action to restore and protect reefs worldwide. The images clearly show the difference between active, healthy reefs and reefs that have suffered severe decline.  Read more…